I am a proud "ablelist", and my son is proof - ADHD Dude - Ryan Wexelblatt

 






𝙄 𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙡𝙞𝙯𝙚𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙥𝙚𝙤𝙥𝙡𝙚 𝙬𝙚𝙧𝙚 "𝙡𝙞𝙠𝙞𝙣𝙜" 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙥𝙝𝙤𝙩𝙤𝙨 𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙞𝙨 𝙥𝙤𝙨𝙩, 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝𝙤𝙪𝙩 𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙙𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙞𝙩 𝙨𝙤 𝙄 𝙬𝙖𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙙 𝙩𝙤 𝙢𝙖𝙠𝙚 𝙞𝙩 𝙘𝙡𝙚𝙖𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙄 𝙙𝙤 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙘𝙤𝙣𝙙𝙤𝙣𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙨𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙨 𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙨𝙚 𝙥𝙝𝙤𝙩𝙤𝙨, 𝙦𝙪𝙞𝙩𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙤𝙥𝙥𝙤𝙨𝙞𝙩𝙚. 𝙄 𝙪𝙨𝙚𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢 𝙩𝙤 𝙞𝙡𝙡𝙪𝙨𝙩𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙚 𝙖 𝙩𝙧𝙚𝙣𝙙 𝙄'𝙢 𝙨𝙚𝙚𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙥𝙚𝙧𝙥𝙚𝙩𝙪𝙖𝙩𝙚𝙙 𝙤𝙣 𝙨𝙤𝙘𝙞𝙖𝙡 𝙢𝙚𝙙𝙞𝙖 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙥𝙚𝙧𝙥𝙚𝙩𝙪𝙖𝙩𝙚𝙨 𝙙𝙞𝙫𝙞𝙨𝙞𝙫𝙚𝙣𝙚𝙨𝙨. 𝙄 𝙛𝙚𝙡𝙩 𝙘𝙖𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙙 𝙩𝙤 𝙨𝙥𝙚𝙖𝙠 𝙤𝙪𝙩 𝙖𝙗𝙤𝙪𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙞𝙨, 𝙗𝙚𝙘𝙖𝙪𝙨𝙚 𝙣𝙤 𝙤𝙣𝙚 𝙚𝙡𝙨𝙚 𝙬𝙖𝙨.

I am the father of a son who I adopted as an older child. He came with his share of challenges & diagnostic labels. I am the son of a mother who had multiple sclerosis, diagnosed when I was 7. As a child I spent a lot of time around people with physical disabilities. I am the son of a father who had severe ADHD. I have been in this field for 20 years, working with kids & young adults diagnosed with ADHD, Asperger’s, higher-verbal autism and intellectual disabilities. My entire life has been spent around people with various challenges.

Over the past 10 years, my professional passion has been teaching kids (and their parents) how to connect with their peers and form social relationships. I did not teach my son, and do not teach the kids I work with that someone is defined by their challenges. I don't believe in teaching identity politics. I don't use terms like "neurotypical", "neurodiverse" or "masking" because I believe they encourage separation between people, rather that promote connection.

The photos in this post were taken from social media posts from a homogenous group of speech-language pathologists and individuals who self-identify as having ADHD or autism. (In the mental health field right now, I believe there is over-diagnosing & misdiagnosing of autism in younger, Caucasian females which is why I question the validity of some of these self-reported diagnoses.)

These individuals perpetuate an 𝘜𝘴 𝘝𝘴. 𝘛𝘩𝘦𝘮 narrative on social media in which the "neurodivergent" must push back against the "neurotypicals". Their identity politics are based in seeing themselves as the "protectors of the neurodivergent", whereas people such as myself are the "ableist villain", because I want my son (and your kids) to be able to function in a world that will never accommodate them.

These 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘵𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘰𝘳𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘯𝘦𝘶𝘳𝘰𝘥𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘨𝘦𝘯𝘵 do not view my son as a young man who must work hard to navigate through the world, which is often a stressful process for him. They perceive him as a (6 foot 1) infant, forced to conform to a neurotypical world in which ableists such as myself have expectations of him, and push him outside of his comfort zone so he can grow. Their job is to protect this fragile, neurodivergent infant, at the expense of becoming a capable young man.

The self-identified individuals whose photos I've used here believe that my professional and personal experience is meaningless and invalid. Anyone who is "neurodivergent" is right and a "neurotypical", such as myself is wrong, 𝘜𝘴 𝘝𝘴. 𝘛𝘩𝘦𝘮. The speech-language pathologists whose photos I've used appear to be obsequious to their 𝘜𝘴 𝘝𝘴. 𝘛𝘩𝘦𝘮 identity politics.

If these 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘵𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘰𝘳𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘯𝘦𝘶𝘳𝘰𝘥𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘨𝘦𝘯𝘵 informed my parenting choices I would have destroyed my son's ability to function in the world. He would never be able to handle his very demanding customer service job where he was promoted last week. He would not go out to dinner or the movies with the guys he works with because he would perceive the world as 𝘜𝘴 𝘝𝘴. 𝘛𝘩𝘦𝘮.

The people who created these posts would call me an "ableist". If being an ableist means that my son can function in the world without me it's an insult I will proudly accept.

"𝗬𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗽𝗿𝗶𝗺𝗮𝗿𝘆 𝗴𝗼𝗮𝗹 𝗼𝗳 𝗮 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗮𝘀𝗶𝗱𝗲 𝗳𝗿𝗼𝗺 𝗳𝗮𝗰𝗶𝗹𝗶𝘁𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗰𝗵𝗶𝗹𝗱'𝘀 𝘀𝗼𝗰𝗶𝗮𝗹 𝗱𝗲𝘀𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗯𝗶𝗹𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗶𝘀 𝘁𝗼 𝗶𝗻𝘀𝘁𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗮 𝘀𝗲𝗻𝘀𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝗰𝗼𝘂𝗿𝗮𝗴𝗲, 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗳𝗮𝗰𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗱𝗶𝗳𝗳𝗶𝗰𝘂𝗹𝘁𝗶𝗲𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝗹𝗶𝗳𝗲, 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗻𝗼𝘁 𝘁𝗼 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝘁𝗲𝗰𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗺 𝗳𝗿𝗼𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁. 𝗪𝗵𝗲𝗻 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗼𝘃𝗲𝗿𝗽𝗿𝗼𝘁𝗲𝗰𝘁, 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗱𝗲𝗺𝗼𝗹𝗶𝘀𝗵 𝗿𝗲𝘀𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗲𝗻𝗰𝗲." -Dr. Jordan Peterson

👉𝗟𝗲𝗮𝗿𝗻 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝗺𝘆 "𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲𝗹𝗶𝘀𝘁" 𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗿𝗼𝗮𝗰𝗵 𝗮𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗔𝗗𝗛𝗗 𝗗𝘂𝗱𝗲 𝗬𝗼𝘂𝗧𝘂𝗯𝗲 𝗰𝗵𝗮𝗻𝗻𝗲𝗹.

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