𝗪𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝗳𝗲𝘀𝘀𝗶𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗹𝘀 𝗮𝗹𝗺𝗼𝘀𝘁 𝗻𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿 𝗲𝘅𝗽𝗹𝗮𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗼 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝗮𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝗔𝗗𝗛𝗗 𝘁𝗿𝗲𝗮𝘁𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗸𝗶𝗱𝘀 - ADHD Dude - Ryan Wexelblatt

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𝗪𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝗳𝗲𝘀𝘀𝗶𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗹𝘀 𝗮𝗹𝗺𝗼𝘀𝘁 𝗻𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿 𝗲𝘅𝗽𝗹𝗮𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗼 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝗮𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝗔𝗗𝗛𝗗

A parent recently shared with me that they were trying individual "talk therapy" and occupational therapy for their son before considering medication. I explained to her that neither of these were recommended treatments for kids with ADHD, per the guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Most parents of kids with ADHD are (unintentionally) misled as soon as their son/daughter receives a diagnosis, because most professionals providing the diagnosis (pediatrician, psychologist, neurologist, psychiatrists) are not familiar with the American Academy of Pediatrics [AAP] treatment recommendations for ADHD. Furthermore, most school and mental health professionals (School Counselors, Licensed Therapists, etc.) are also unfamiliar with the AAP treatment recommendations. As a result, they refer parents to services that are not recommended treatments, the most common being individual therapy for kids.

𝗞𝗶𝗱𝘀 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗔𝗗𝗛𝗗 𝗰𝗮𝗻 𝗺𝗼𝘀𝘁 𝗲𝗳𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲𝗹𝘆 𝗱𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗹𝗼𝗽 𝘀𝗸𝗶𝗹𝗹𝘀 𝘄𝗵𝗲𝗻:
1. Parents shift the way they use language to help build skills.
2. Parents consistently provide the "scaffolding" around kids to facilitate the development of skills.
3. Parents are willing to make some modifications in their parenting style in order to do what is most effective for the ADHD brain.
4. Parents understand that ADHD is an executive function developmental delay, not a mental health issue that will improve by a kid sitting in a therapists office talking about feelings or "learning coping skills".

#4 𝙞𝙨 𝙬𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙄 𝙛𝙞𝙣𝙙 𝙥𝙖𝙧𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙨 𝙜𝙚𝙩 𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙡𝙡𝙮 𝙨𝙩𝙪𝙘𝙠. I can tell you it is the most common reason why I meet families once, and then don't hear from them again. They are not interested in the work they need to do here. Rather, they want to "outsource" the work to a professional, with the expectation that their kid will change through talking to a professional, which is both unrealistic and incongruent with the AAP treatment recommendations.

𝗛𝗲𝗿𝗲'𝘀 𝘄𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗜 𝘁𝗲𝗹𝗹 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝗿𝗲𝗴𝗮𝗿𝗱𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿𝗮𝗽𝘆: I am all for therapy if kids feel like it would be helpful for them to talk to someone, keeping in mind that individual therapy will not address ADHD-related challenges. Please don't make them go to individual therapy simply because they have ADHD and a professional recommended it to you.

The 2nd photo here is the AAP treatment recommendations, available at the CDC website. 𝙄 𝙥𝙧𝙤𝙫𝙞𝙙𝙚 𝙥𝙖𝙧𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙩𝙧𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙞𝙣 𝙗𝙚𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙞𝙤𝙧 𝙢𝙖𝙣𝙖𝙜𝙚𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙧𝙤𝙪𝙜𝙝 𝙢𝙮 𝙬𝙚𝙗𝙞𝙣𝙖𝙧 𝙨𝙚𝙧𝙞𝙚𝙨, 𝙎𝙘𝙖𝙛𝙛𝙤𝙡𝙙𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝘽𝙚𝙩𝙩𝙚𝙧 𝘽𝙚𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙞𝙤𝙧 & 𝙎𝙚𝙡𝙛-𝘾𝙤𝙣𝙛𝙞𝙙𝙚𝙣𝙘𝙚, 𝙖𝙫𝙖𝙞𝙡𝙖𝙗𝙡𝙚 𝙖𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝘼𝘿𝙃𝘿 𝘿𝙪𝙙𝙚 𝙈𝙚𝙢𝙗𝙚𝙧𝙨𝙝𝙞𝙥 𝙎𝙞𝙩𝙚.

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