How to start the school year off by building executive function skills - ADHD Dude - Ryan Wexelblatt

 

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𝗝𝗮𝗻𝗲 (𝘔𝘰𝘮 𝘰𝘧 𝘌𝘷𝘢𝘯, 𝘢𝘨𝘦 13): 𝘌𝘷𝘢𝘯 𝘨𝘦𝘵𝘴 𝘦𝘹𝘦𝘤𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘧𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘪𝘯 𝘴𝘤𝘩𝘰𝘰𝘭 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘪𝘴𝘵 𝘪𝘴 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘯 𝘪𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘢𝘴 𝘸𝘦𝘭𝘭. 𝘐 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘭 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦'𝘴 𝘢 𝘮𝘪𝘴𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘱𝘪𝘦𝘤𝘦 𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘸𝘩𝘪𝘤𝘩 𝘪𝘴 𝘸𝘩𝘺 𝘐 𝘸𝘢𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘩 𝘰𝘶𝘵.
𝗥𝘆𝗮𝗻: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵'𝘴 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘦𝘹𝘦𝘤𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘧𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘩𝘦 𝘨𝘦𝘵𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘴𝘤𝘩𝘰𝘰𝘭?
𝗝𝗮𝗻𝗲: 𝘏𝘦 𝘩𝘢𝘴 𝘢 𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘰𝘶𝘳𝘤𝘦 𝘴𝘵𝘶𝘥𝘺 𝘩𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘩𝘦 𝘨𝘰𝘦𝘴 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘥𝘢𝘺 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘵𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘨𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘴 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘴𝘶𝘳𝘦 𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘢𝘴 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘦 𝘯𝘦𝘦𝘥𝘴.
𝗥𝘆𝗮𝗻: 𝘖.𝘒. 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘪𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘪𝘴𝘵 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘯 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘩𝘪𝘮?
𝗝𝗮𝗻𝗲: 𝘏𝘦'𝘴 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘯 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘢𝘱𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘱𝘳𝘪𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘺𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘌𝘷𝘢𝘯 to 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘴 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 of 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘸𝘢𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘰 𝘥𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 𝘤𝘩𝘰𝘳𝘦𝘴. 𝘛𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘥𝘰 𝘢 𝘭𝘰𝘵 𝘰𝘧 𝘳𝘰𝘭𝘦-𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘺𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘧 𝘴𝘤𝘦𝘯𝘢𝘳𝘪𝘰𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘩𝘢𝘱𝘱𝘦𝘯 𝘢𝘵 𝘩𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘴𝘰 𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘭𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘯 𝘣𝘦𝘵𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘸𝘢𝘺𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘥𝘦𝘢𝘭 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮.
𝗥𝘆𝗮𝗻: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘥𝘦𝘴𝘤𝘳𝘪𝘣𝘦𝘥 𝘪𝘯 𝘳𝘦𝘨𝘢𝘳𝘥𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘴𝘤𝘩𝘰𝘰𝘭 𝘪𝘴 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘦𝘹𝘦𝘤𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘧𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱. 𝘌𝘹𝘦𝘤𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘧𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘪𝘯 𝘴𝘤𝘩𝘰𝘰𝘭 𝘸𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥 𝘭𝘰𝘰𝘬 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 𝘵𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘨𝘪𝘦𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘣𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘢𝘯 𝘪𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘭𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘯𝘦𝘳.
𝘈𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘺, 𝘐 𝘤𝘢𝘯'𝘵 𝘴𝘢𝘺 𝘐 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘴𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘢𝘯𝘺 𝘬𝘪𝘥𝘴 𝘥𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘭𝘰𝘱 𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘺 𝘵𝘰 𝘨𝘦𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘯𝘰𝘯-𝘱𝘳𝘦𝘧𝘦𝘳𝘳𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘢𝘴𝘬𝘴 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘰𝘯𝘦𝘴 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘢𝘳𝘵𝘪𝘤𝘶𝘭𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘥𝘴 𝘰𝘳 𝘳𝘰𝘭𝘦-𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘺𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘥𝘦𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘦𝘥 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮. 𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘺 𝘩𝘦'𝘴 𝘨𝘰𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘰 𝘥𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘭𝘰𝘱 𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘺 𝘪𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘴𝘤𝘢𝘧𝘧𝘰𝘭𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘭𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘯 𝘵𝘰 𝘶𝘴𝘦 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘦𝘱𝘪𝘴𝘰𝘥𝘪𝘤 𝘮𝘦𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘺. 𝘞𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘈𝘋𝘏𝘋, 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘭𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘯 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵, 𝘸𝘩𝘪𝘤𝘩 𝘪𝘴 𝘸𝘩𝘺 𝘐 𝘵𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘩 𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘩𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘬𝘪𝘥𝘴 𝘥𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘭𝘰𝘱 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘴𝘦 𝘴𝘬𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘴.

Jane was a professional acquaintance I knew because we were both members of a local professional organization comprised of mental health clinicians who work with kids.

Jane's story was similar story to most of the therapist parents I have worked with. She sought out a psychologist to work with Evan individually. She then reached out to me 7 months later when she was ready to acknowledge that Evan wasn't showing any improvement in his weekly therapy sessions.

Like most mental health professionals, Jane did not know that individual therapy for kids with ADHD is not a recommended treatment, per the guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

I taught Jane and Evan the strategies I teach in 𝗪𝗲𝗯𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗿 𝟰 𝗼𝗳 𝗘𝘅𝗲𝗰𝘂𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝗙𝘂𝗻𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗖𝗿𝗮𝘀𝗵 𝗖𝗼𝘂𝗿𝘀𝗲-𝙃𝙚𝙡𝙥𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙘𝙝𝙞𝙡𝙙 𝙡𝙚𝙖𝙧𝙣 𝙩𝙤 𝙜𝙚𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙧𝙤𝙪𝙜𝙝 𝙣𝙤𝙣-𝙥𝙧𝙚𝙛𝙚𝙧𝙧𝙚𝙙 𝙩𝙖𝙨𝙠𝙨 as well as some of the strategies I teach in the other webinars in the series. I also gave Jane suggestions to reduce the IEP accommodations that were keeping him 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘮𝘱𝘵-𝘥𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘵 on his teachers, and were inhibiting him from developing his executive function skills and independence.

Jane was initially skeptical about my approaches, which was to be expected. She was coming from the mental health perspective that lack of motivation must be a mental health issue that can be overcome through talking about feelings, role playing, etc.
𝗝𝗮𝗻𝗲 𝗵𝗮𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗽 𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝗼𝗳 𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝗼𝘄𝗻 𝗺𝗶𝗻𝗱𝘀𝗲𝘁 𝘁𝗼 𝘂𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗿𝘀𝘁𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗘𝘃𝗮𝗻 𝙙𝙞𝙙 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝗵𝗮𝘃𝗲 𝗮 𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗮𝗹 𝗵𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗶𝘀𝘀𝘂𝗲, 𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝗵𝗲 𝗵𝗮𝗱 𝗮𝗻 𝗲𝘅𝗲𝗰𝘂𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝗳𝘂𝗻𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗶𝘀𝘀𝘂𝗲.

Evan was receptive to using the strategies because I explained to him that they were a way for him to gain more free time, and cut down on homework time.

When Jane began to see the gradual improvements in Evan's independence and when his complaining/whining about doing chores at home went down to a minimum she acknowledged it was initially difficult to get out of her own mindset of seeing ADHD as a mental health issue.

𝗜𝗳 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝘁𝗿𝘂𝗹𝘆 𝘄𝗮𝗻𝘁 𝘁𝗼 𝗵𝗲𝗹𝗽 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝘀𝗼𝗻 𝗼𝗿 𝗱𝗮𝘂𝗴𝗵𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝗶𝗺𝗽𝗿𝗼𝘃𝗲 𝗵𝗶𝘀/𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝗲𝘅𝗲𝗰𝘂𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝗳𝘂𝗻𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝘀𝗸𝗶𝗹𝗹𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗶𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗽𝗲𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗻𝗰𝗲 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗵𝗮𝘃𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗮𝗸𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗹𝗲𝗮𝗿𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗼 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗼𝘄𝗻 𝗵𝗮𝗻𝗱𝘀.

𝗛𝗲𝗿𝗲'𝘀 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗽𝗮𝘁𝗵 𝘁𝗼 𝘀𝘁𝗮𝗿𝘁 𝗵𝗲𝗹𝗽𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝘀𝗼𝗻/𝗱𝗮𝘂𝗴𝗵𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝗶𝗺𝗽𝗿𝗼𝘃𝗲 𝗵𝗶𝘀/𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝗲𝘅𝗲𝗰𝘂𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝗳𝘂𝗻𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝘀𝗸𝗶𝗹𝗹𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘀𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹 𝘆𝗲𝗮𝗿:
1. Check out my videos in the Executive Function playlist at the ADHD Dude YouTube channel here: https://bit.ly/efadhddude
2. When you're ready to make life easier at home you can watch the Executive Function Crash Course Webinar series. The strategies I teach in the webinars are easy to implement and are designed for kids. (No hanging up lists, checklists, etc.)

𝗘𝘅𝗲𝗰𝘂𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝗙𝘂𝗻𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗖𝗿𝗮𝘀𝗵 𝗖𝗼𝘂𝗿𝘀𝗲 𝗶𝘀 𝗮𝘃𝗮𝗶𝗹𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗔𝗗𝗛𝗗 𝗗𝘂𝗱𝗲 𝗠𝗲𝗺𝗯𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗵𝗶𝗽 𝗦𝗶𝘁𝗲.
Webinar 1: Using language to build executive functioning
Webinar 2: Creating scaffolding to get through daily routines
Webinar 3: "Feeling" time & getting off of video games without a fight
Webinar 4: Helping your child to get through non-preferred tasks
Webinar 5: Structuring homework time, using a planner & calendar

𝗥𝗲𝗮𝗱 𝗙𝗿𝗲𝗾𝘂𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗹𝘆 𝗔𝘀𝗸𝗲𝗱 𝗤𝘂𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀: https://www.adhddudecourses.com/FAQs

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