When parents of kids with ADHD reach their "independence tipping point" - ADHD Dude - Ryan Wexelblatt

𝗣𝗮𝗿𝗲𝗻𝘁: 𝘏𝘦'𝘴 𝘢 𝘴𝘦𝘯𝘪𝘰𝘳 𝘪𝘯 𝘩𝘪𝘨𝘩 𝘴𝘤𝘩𝘰𝘰𝘭. 𝘐 𝘥𝘰𝘯'𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘬 𝘢𝘵 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘢𝘨𝘦 𝘐 𝘴𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥 𝘴𝘵𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘯𝘦𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘸𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘶𝘱 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘴𝘤𝘩𝘰𝘰𝘭, 𝘳𝘦𝘮𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘵𝘰 𝘣𝘳𝘶𝘴𝘩 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘵𝘦𝘦𝘵𝘩 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘦𝘭𝘴𝘦 𝘐 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘳𝘦𝘮𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘵𝘰 𝘥𝘰 𝘰𝘯 𝘢 𝘥𝘢𝘪𝘭𝘺 𝘣𝘢𝘴𝘪𝘴  𝘐𝘵'𝘴 𝘦𝘹𝘩𝘢𝘶𝘴𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨, 𝘐 𝘯𝘦𝘦𝘥 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘵𝘰 𝘨𝘳𝘰𝘸 𝘶𝘱. 𝘏𝘦'𝘴 𝘢𝘭𝘮𝘰𝘴𝘵 18.
𝗥𝘆𝗮𝗻: 𝘐 𝘤𝘦𝘳𝘵𝘢𝘪𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘧𝘳𝘶𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘩𝘰𝘸𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘬𝘪𝘥𝘴 𝘥𝘰𝘯'𝘵 𝘴𝘶𝘥𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘣𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘪𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘥𝘦𝘤𝘪𝘥𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘪𝘵 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘢𝘱𝘱𝘦𝘯, 𝘪𝘵'𝘴 𝘢 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘤𝘦𝘴𝘴. 𝘍𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘴𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘦𝘥 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘮𝘦 𝘪𝘵 𝘴𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 𝘩𝘦'𝘴 𝘩𝘢𝘴 17 𝘺𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘧𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘺 𝘢𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘢𝘴 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘦𝘹𝘦𝘤𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘧𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘩𝘪𝘮.  𝘏𝘦 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘣𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘪𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘪𝘵'𝘴 𝘨𝘰𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘰 𝘳𝘦𝘲𝘶𝘪𝘳𝘦 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘵𝘰 𝘪𝘮𝘱𝘭𝘦𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘨𝘪𝘦𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘧𝘢𝘤𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴.  𝘐𝘵'𝘴 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘌𝘳𝘪𝘤 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘥𝘰 𝘰𝘯 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘰𝘸𝘯, 𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘤𝘢𝘧𝘧𝘰𝘭𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘢𝘱𝘱𝘦𝘯, 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘯 𝘢𝘵 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘢𝘨𝘦.

I met Eric as he began his senior year.  Towards the end of 11th grade his mother started to grow tired of his lack of independence when she realized Eric's 14 year old brother was more independent than Eric.  She had reached her 𝘪𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘵𝘪𝘱𝘱𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘱𝘰𝘪𝘯𝘵, the time when a parent expects their son/daughter to start using their own executive functioning, despite the fact they've been over-dependent on their parents (and other adults) their entire life.  

Eric went to counseling on and off for many years.  The counselor assured Eric's parents that he would become independent when he was ready and they shouldn't push it, rather just accept him for who he is. (Well-intended but bad advice.)

I taught Eric's parent's how to change the language they use to stop prompting him so he could improve his self-directed talk (Webinar 1).   We worked on transitioning Eric to waking up and going through his morning routine on his own (Webinar 2).  I taught Eric and his parents how to conceptualize time (Webinar 3) so he could develop his own sense or urgency.  Like many kids I've worked with, Eric moved at his own speed.  Because Eric was a senior, I taught him how to motivate himself to persevere through non-preferred tasks (Webinar 4) and how to stop wasting time going through his school's disjointed homework portal by writing the homework down manually and using a calendar to help develop his future thinking skills (Webinar 5).  

The strategies I taught Eric and his parents are the most common strategies I teach families. I made this available in a series of 5 webinars, all less than an hour long that you can watch as much as you want, whenever you want.

𝙏𝙝𝙞𝙨 𝙬𝙚𝙗𝙞𝙣𝙖𝙧 𝙨𝙚𝙧𝙞𝙚𝙨 𝙞𝙨 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙮𝙤𝙪 𝙞𝙛:
✅You want practical, easy to implement strategies that you can start using immediately.
✅You want to move away from fighting to get of video games, constantly prompting or nagging.
✅You can help your son/daughter have more free time to themselves. 
✅You're ready to create the structure that will allow him/her to begin using his/her executive function skills instead of you acting as his/her executive functioning. 
✅You want to help your son/daughter build confidence through realizing they are more capable than the realized.  (𝘙𝘦𝘮𝘦𝘮𝘣𝘦𝘳: 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘪𝘻𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮𝘴𝘦𝘭𝘷𝘦𝘴, 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘱𝘳𝘢𝘪𝘴𝘦/𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘴𝘴𝘶𝘳𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘸𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘷𝘪𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮.)

𝗥𝗮𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗻 𝘁𝗿𝘆𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗼 𝘀𝗲𝗹𝗹 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗼𝗻 𝘄𝗵𝘆 𝗰𝗹𝗼𝘀𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝟭𝟰𝟬𝟬 𝗳𝗮𝗺𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗲𝘀 𝗵𝗮𝘃𝗲 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗶𝗽𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘀𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗲𝘀 𝘀𝗼 𝗳𝗮𝗿 𝗜'𝗱 𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗵𝗲𝗮𝗿 𝘄𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝗵𝗮𝘃𝗲 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗶𝗽𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗵𝗮𝘃𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝘀𝗮𝘆.
(You can scroll through older posts here for the series or check out the ADHD Dude Google business page: https://g.page/adhd-dude-ryan-wexelblatt?we)

𝗔𝗹𝗹 𝘄𝗲𝗯𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗿𝘀 𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝘃𝗮𝗶𝗹𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲, 𝘀𝗰𝗿𝗼𝗹𝗹 𝗽𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘀𝗼𝗹𝗱 𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝘀𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀: https://adhddude.clickmeeting.com/

𝗪𝗮𝘁𝗰𝗵 𝗮 𝘃𝗶𝗱𝗲𝗼 𝗮𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘀𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗲𝘀 𝗵𝗲𝗿𝗲: https://youtu.be/s-aiUXIbyas

Comments