How parents are unintentionally misled as soon as they receive an ADHD diagnosis. - ADHD Dude - Ryan Wexelblatt, LCSW

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𝗛𝗼𝘄 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝘂𝗻𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗹𝗹𝘆 𝗺𝗶𝘀𝗹𝗲𝗱 𝗮𝘀 𝘀𝗼𝗼𝗻 𝗮𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝘆 𝗿𝗲𝗰𝗲𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝗮𝗻 𝗔𝗗𝗛𝗗 𝗱𝗶𝗮𝗴𝗻𝗼𝘀𝗶𝘀.

I have read hundreds of evaluation reports done by Psychologists and Neuropsychologists. All evaluation reports have a series of recommendations at the end of them. I have found that when an ADHD diagnosis is confirmed through an evaluation, the recommendations are rote, and in my opinion, very outdated.

I want to clarify that professionals who conduct evaluations tend to be focused on the evaluation side rather than the intervention side thus most do not have the time to be researching more forward-thinking and practical interventions to address ADHD-related challenges.

Recently, I read an evaluation report from a psychologist who evaluated a 12-year old. As I read the usual recommendations I see in evaluation reports I reflected on how frequently parents beginning this journey to understanding ADHD are unintentionally misled by well-meaning professionals.

𝗟𝗲𝘁 𝗺𝗲 𝘀𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝘀𝗼𝗺𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗿𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗺𝗲𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝗳𝗿𝗼𝗺 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗲𝘃𝗮𝗹𝘂𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝘆𝗼𝘂:
𝗥𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗺𝗲𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝟭: 𝘈 𝘣𝘰𝘰𝘬 𝘢𝘣𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘦𝘹𝘦𝘤𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘧𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘦𝘹𝘦𝘤𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘧𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯/𝘈𝘋𝘏𝘋 𝘣𝘰𝘰𝘬𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘤𝘶𝘴𝘦𝘴 𝘰𝘯 𝘢𝘤𝘢𝘥𝘦𝘮𝘪𝘤 𝘰𝘳𝘨𝘢𝘯𝘪𝘻𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘴𝘬𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘴. Many diagnosticians give parents recommendations for books or other resources that provide the same strategies that most parents find are temporarily helpful, or not helpful at all because they focus on academic organizational skills or antiquated time management strategies. These books do not teach parents: how to help move their child from being "prompt-dependent" towards independent, the language that can help kids develop their self-directed talk (what I call "brain coach") or how to help kids develop resiliency to persevere through non-preferred tasks. I created Executive Function Crash Course for Parents Webinar Series because I recognized that parents need much more than information about academic organizational skills or outdated recommendations that don't work for most kids.
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𝗥𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗺𝗲𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝟮: 𝘍𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘢 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘪𝘴𝘵 𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘪𝘯𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 "𝘑𝘰𝘩𝘯" 𝘪𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘧𝘺 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴. 𝘈 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘪𝘴𝘵 𝘵𝘳𝘢𝘪𝘯𝘦𝘥 𝘪𝘯 𝘊𝘉𝘛 (𝘊𝘰𝘨𝘯𝘪𝘵𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘉𝘦𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘪𝘰𝘳 𝘛𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘺) 𝘸𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥 𝘣𝘦 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱𝘧𝘶𝘭. 𝘛𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬 𝘰𝘯 𝘪𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘧𝘺𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘥𝘴.
𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙦𝙪𝙚𝙨𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣 𝙥𝙖𝙧𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙨 𝙨𝙝𝙤𝙪𝙡𝙙 𝙖𝙨𝙠 𝙞𝙨: 𝙒𝙝𝙮 𝙙𝙤𝙚𝙨 𝙗𝙚𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙙𝙞𝙖𝙜𝙣𝙤𝙨𝙚𝙙 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝘼𝘿𝙃𝘿 𝙢𝙚𝙖𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙘𝙝𝙞𝙡𝙙 𝙣𝙚𝙚𝙙𝙨 "𝙩𝙖𝙡𝙠 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙖𝙥𝙮"?
Think about this very common sequence of events:
>Kid is brought to therapist's office, no one explains why.
>ADHD is never explained to him/her in a way that is relatable or relevant.
>Most therapists have no specific education/training in addressing ADHD thus there is little offered to parents in terms of helping to build lagging executive function, social cognitive or behavior management skills.
>When therapists do not have understanding ADHD they tend to create speculative narratives to make meaning of ADHD-related challenges. I've heard the following in the past year from parents: "𝘏𝘦'𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘥𝘦𝘯𝘪𝘢𝘭 𝘢𝘣𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘪𝘴𝘴𝘶𝘦𝘴, 𝘏𝘦 𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘬𝘴 𝘦𝘮𝘱𝘢𝘵𝘩𝘺, 𝘏𝘦'𝘴 𝘫𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘰𝘶𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘳 𝘣𝘳𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦r 𝘸𝘩𝘪𝘤𝘩 𝘪𝘴 𝘸𝘩𝘺 𝘩𝘦 𝘭𝘢𝘴𝘩𝘦𝘴 𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘵𝘦𝘭𝘭 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘵𝘰 𝘨𝘦𝘵 𝘰𝘧𝘧 𝘍𝘰𝘳𝘵𝘯𝘪𝘵𝘦"

Why does John need therapy to help identify "feeling words"? 𝙈𝙤𝙨𝙩 12 𝙮𝙚𝙖𝙧 𝙤𝙡𝙙𝙨 𝙄'𝙫𝙚 𝙬𝙤𝙧𝙠𝙚𝙙 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝙘𝙖𝙣 𝙞𝙙𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙛𝙮 𝙛𝙚𝙚𝙡𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙬𝙤𝙧𝙙𝙨 𝙥𝙚𝙧𝙛𝙚𝙘𝙩𝙡𝙮 𝙛𝙞𝙣𝙚 𝙗𝙪𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙮 𝙢𝙞𝙜𝙝𝙩 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙗𝙚 𝙖𝙗𝙡𝙚 𝙩𝙤 𝙙𝙤 𝙨𝙤 𝙤𝙣-𝙙𝙚𝙢𝙖𝙣𝙙, 𝙗𝙚𝙘𝙖𝙪𝙨𝙚 𝙢𝙤𝙨𝙩 𝙗𝙤𝙮'𝙨 𝙗𝙧𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙨 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙬𝙞𝙧𝙚𝙙 𝙡𝙞𝙠𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩. CBT has shown effectiveness for adults with ADHD, not kids. CBT requires one to use self-directed talk which is lagging in individuals with ADHD. Based on feedback parents have shared with me, many clinicians trained in CBT do not always have a strong understanding of ADHD thus may not realize that many CBT strategies will not work for the developing ADHD brain. (I do think certain aspects of CBT, specifically exposures can be very helpful to treating anxiety.)
𝙒𝙝𝙚𝙣 𝘼𝘿𝙃𝘿 𝙞𝙨 𝙩𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙩𝙚𝙙 𝙖𝙨 𝙖 𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙖𝙡 𝙝𝙚𝙖𝙡𝙩𝙝 𝙞𝙨𝙨𝙪𝙚 𝙞𝙩 𝙘𝙖𝙣 𝙚𝙖𝙨𝙞𝙡𝙮 𝙘𝙖𝙪𝙨𝙚 𝙠𝙞𝙙𝙨 𝙩𝙤 𝙛𝙚𝙚𝙡 𝙙𝙚𝙛𝙚𝙘𝙩𝙞𝙫𝙚 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙥𝙖𝙩𝙝𝙤𝙡𝙤𝙜𝙞𝙯𝙚𝙙, 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝𝙤𝙪𝙩 𝙚𝙫𝙚𝙣 𝙖𝙙𝙙𝙧𝙚𝙨𝙨𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙘𝙤𝙧𝙚 𝙘𝙝𝙖𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙣𝙜𝙚𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙖 𝙧𝙚𝙨𝙪𝙡𝙩 𝙤𝙛 𝘼𝘿𝙃𝘿.
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𝗥𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗺𝗲𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝟯: 𝘈𝘯 𝘈𝘋𝘏𝘋 𝘤𝘰𝘢𝘤𝘩 𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘢𝘤𝘢𝘥𝘦𝘮𝘪𝘤 𝘰𝘳𝘨𝘢𝘯𝘪𝘻𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘴𝘬𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘴. I don't disagree with this yet academic organizational skills are a symptom of deeper executive functioning challenges. There are some excellent coaches out there and coaching is an unregulated field. There is no degree required, no state licensing board that distinguishes tiers of training or experience, etc. Furthermore, because executive functioning is so poorly understood in our society many people do not realize that if you do not address the foundational executive function skills, 𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙖 𝙬𝙚𝙡𝙡 𝙤𝙧𝙜𝙖𝙣𝙞𝙯𝙚𝙙 𝙗𝙞𝙣𝙙𝙚𝙧 𝙙𝙤𝙚𝙨𝙣'𝙩 𝙢𝙚𝙖𝙣 𝙢𝙪𝙘𝙝 𝙞𝙛 𝙮𝙤𝙪'𝙧𝙚 𝙨𝙩𝙞𝙡𝙡 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙥𝙡𝙚𝙩𝙚𝙡𝙮 𝙥𝙧𝙤𝙢𝙥𝙩-𝙙𝙚𝙥𝙚𝙣𝙙𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙤𝙣 𝙖𝙙𝙪𝙡𝙩𝙨 𝙩𝙤 𝙖𝙘𝙩 𝙖𝙨 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙚𝙭𝙚𝙘𝙪𝙩𝙞𝙫𝙚 𝙛𝙪𝙣𝙘𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜.
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𝗥𝗲𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗺𝗲𝗻𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝟰: 𝘈 𝘴𝘰𝘤𝘪𝘢𝘭 𝘴𝘬𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘴 𝘨𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘱 𝘸𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘵𝘰 𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘥 𝘴𝘰𝘤𝘪𝘢𝘭 𝘤𝘶𝘦𝘴. 𝙏𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙞𝙨 𝙣𝙤 𝙚𝙫𝙞𝙙𝙚𝙣𝙘𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙨𝙤𝙘𝙞𝙖𝙡 𝙨𝙠𝙞𝙡𝙡𝙨 𝙜𝙧𝙤𝙪𝙥𝙨 𝙝𝙚𝙡𝙥 𝙠𝙞𝙙𝙨 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝘼𝘿𝙃𝘿. 𝙏𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙣𝙤 𝙧𝙚𝙦𝙪𝙞𝙧𝙚𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙨 𝙩𝙤 𝙧𝙪𝙣 𝙖 𝙨𝙤𝙘𝙞𝙖𝙡 𝙨𝙠𝙞𝙡𝙡𝙨 𝙜𝙧𝙤𝙪𝙥, 𝙣𝙤 𝙚𝙙𝙪𝙘𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣/𝙩𝙧𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙧𝙚𝙦𝙪𝙞𝙧𝙚𝙙. Most social skills groups do not evaluate kids to determine their social learning needs, rather they just use a "one size fits all" approach meaning they will take anyone, without knowing their specific social learning needs or severity of their social learning challenges. I do like skills-based groups for kids as well as pragmatic language building groups. I see no value in typical social skills groups where boys are not learning about male-male social communication or how to make themselves more endearing to their similar-age peers. 𝙄𝙩 𝙞𝙨 𝙞𝙢𝙥𝙤𝙧𝙩𝙖𝙣𝙩 𝙩𝙤 𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙗𝙤𝙩𝙝 𝙙𝙞𝙖𝙜𝙣𝙤𝙨𝙩𝙞𝙘𝙞𝙖𝙣𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙖𝙡 𝙝𝙚𝙖𝙡𝙩𝙝 𝙩𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙩𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙥𝙧𝙤𝙫𝙞𝙙𝙚𝙧𝙨 𝙛𝙧𝙚𝙦𝙪𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙡𝙮 𝙢𝙞𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙠𝙚 𝙨𝙤𝙘𝙞𝙖𝙡 𝙖𝙣𝙭𝙞𝙚𝙩𝙮 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙨𝙤𝙘𝙞𝙖𝙡 𝙡𝙚𝙖𝙧𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙘𝙝𝙖𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙣𝙜𝙚𝙨 𝙗𝙚𝙘𝙖𝙪𝙨𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙮 𝙢𝙖𝙮 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙠𝙣𝙤𝙬 𝙝𝙤𝙬 𝙩𝙤 𝙙𝙞𝙨𝙘𝙚𝙧𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙙𝙞𝙛𝙛𝙚𝙧𝙚𝙣𝙘𝙚. 𝙎𝙤𝙘𝙞𝙖𝙡 𝙖𝙣𝙭𝙞𝙚𝙩𝙮 𝙞𝙨 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙖𝙙𝙙𝙧𝙚𝙨𝙨𝙚𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙧𝙤𝙪𝙜𝙝 𝙗𝙚𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙞𝙣 𝙖 𝙨𝙤𝙘𝙞𝙖𝙡 𝙨𝙠𝙞𝙡𝙡𝙨 𝙜𝙧𝙤𝙪𝙥.
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The reason I wrote this post is because I believe the ADHD field has stagnated for years. I want families to "think outside the box" and take learning into their own hands so they can help their child(ren) in the most cost and time effective ways possible.

👉𝘾𝙤𝙢𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙣𝙚𝙭𝙩 𝙛𝙚𝙬 𝙢𝙤𝙣𝙩𝙝𝙨:
🧿𝗡𝗲𝘄 𝗪𝗲𝗯𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗿: Executive Function Crash Course Strategies applied to virtual learning.
🧿𝗡𝗲𝘄 𝗪𝗲𝗯𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗿 𝗦𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗲𝘀: 𝘙𝘢𝘪𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘎𝘰𝘰𝘥 𝘋𝘶𝘥𝘦𝘴 (A behavior therapy program based on the ADHD Dude methodology).
🧿𝗡𝗲𝘄 𝗪𝗲𝗯𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗿 𝗦𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗲𝘀 (unnamed): Helping your son improve his social skills from a male perspective.
🧿𝗢𝗻𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗲 𝘀𝗼𝗰𝗶𝗮𝗹 𝗹𝗲𝗮𝗿𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝗴𝗿𝗮𝗺𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗯𝗼𝘆𝘀

👉🏽𝗦𝗶𝗴𝗻 𝘂𝗽 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗻𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗹 𝗔𝗗𝗛𝗗 𝗗𝘂𝗱𝗲 𝗺𝗮𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗹𝗶𝘀𝘁: https://www.subscribepage.com/adhddude

𝗣𝗵𝗶𝗹𝗮𝗱𝗲𝗹𝗽𝗵𝗶𝗮 𝗮𝗿𝗲𝗮 𝗹𝗶𝘀𝘁: https://www.subscribepage.com/adhddudephilalist

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